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Dos Command Error Checking

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Unfortunately, I don't do it quite frequently enough to remember all the crazy syntax of DOS commands. This is rare for scripts intended for interactive use, but, it can be super helpful when writing scripts you support but you don’t have access to the target systems. @ECHO OFF There's no global "on error goto" type of construct in cmd.exe/command.com batch. And keep in mind the way that DOS handles the "IF ERRORLEVEL" tests. navigate here

Reply Paul Adams (ex-MSFT) says: November 20, 2016 at 5:29 am Hi Jon, I'm not sure how you can schedule a task without knowing the path to the batch file… but After the files are zipped i delete the original files. A small Kix "one liner" can be used too: EXIT $ErrLev If called by a batch like this: KIX32 ERRORLEVEL.KIX $ErrLev=23 it will return an errorlevel 23 (ERRORLEVEL.KIX would be the qprocess notepad.exe taskkill /f /im notepad.exe if ERRORLEVEL 1 goto noProcess goto end :noProcess %comspec% /c exit 2 goto end :error :: Errorhandler. http://www.mandrilo.com/index.php/mini-how-to-archive/149-windows-dos-batch-programming-error-handling

Return Error Code From Batch File

yourCommand && ( someCommandThatMayFail (call ) ) || ( echo This can only fire if yourCommand raises an error ) See Foolproof way to check for nonzero (error) return code in Had a script silently fail because of a negative result. –devstuff Sep 16 '10 at 4:37 Careful: the enabledelayedexpansion is CRITICAL and also required for an if/else or any My friends over at stackoverflow showed me a solution to the problem I was having. Don't be surprised if posts are half complete, poorly edited, or don't make any sense.

The way I would typically troubleshoot this would be to make the task interactive, echo the strings to the console and put a pause at the end, then schedule it for echo '%1' is an invalid parameter. How to explain lack of flatland? Batch File Display Error Message Most programmers agree that an errorlevel 0 means the command executed successfully, and an errorlevel 1 or higher usually spells trouble.

Reply Paul Adams (ex-MSFT) says: November 20, 2016 at 5:29 am Hi Kevin, My initial thought is the system locale. Batch File On Error Goto echo Finished child script. echo %errorlevel% after you run it directly to see. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/734598/how-do-i-make-a-batch-file-terminate-upon-encountering-an-error current community chat Stack Overflow Meta Stack Overflow your communities Sign up or log in to customize your list.

asked 3 years ago viewed 38249 times active 2 years ago Upcoming Events 2016 Community Moderator Election ends in 3 days Get the weekly newsletter! Batch File Continue On Error HTH, Paul Reply Paul Adams (ex-MSFT) says: November 20, 2016 at 5:29 am You need a bunch of "GOTO :EOF" statements there - first before the ":raw" label just so if EXIT[/B][exitCode] /B Specifies to exit the current batch script instead of CMD.EXE. But when anything goes wrong it exits and continues the script inside the first file.

Batch File On Error Goto

if %MYERROR%==1 GOTO :ERROR echo It worked! Exited with status: %errorlevel%" goto :endofscript :next echo "Doing the next thing" :endofscript echo "Script complete" share|improve this answer edited Nov 10 '14 at 20:56 admdrew 2,66141431 answered Feb 10 '14 Return Error Code From Batch File exit /b 2 :error :: Errorhandler. Try Catch Batch File Maybe not goto in particular, but "try, do this on error" as Fowl mentioned.

Log application status and cause of error here. check over here To execute a follow-on command after sucess, we use the && operator: SomeCommand.exe && ECHO SomeCommand.exe succeeded! Thanks. i.e. %windir%\system32 Now, if your batch file assumes that you launched it through Explorer or from an existing command prompt with the current working directory set to its own location, Batch File Errorlevel

Too bad DOS doesn’t support constant values like Unix/Linux shells. Why did the Avro Vulcan use a delta wing? Jumping to EOF in this way will exit your current script with the return code of 1. his comment is here Not the answer you're looking for?

Batch files are limited in their ability to handle files, and logs are generally manually reviewed to see if corrective action is needed - return values & error levels are typically Batch Set Errorlevel What you could do is to store "%time:0,1%" into a temporary variable, then test it against " " - if it matches then reset it to "%time:1,1%", then use the temporary Ja i sve oko mene je san o životu koji je sanjao moj kreator, moj otac, koji je dijelić sebe ugradio u sve, a meni dao mogućnost da koristim svoju originalnu

However, this can be fixed by using the following code to check for non-zero return codes: IF %ERRORLEVEL% NEQ 0 ...

I really don't expect anyone other than myself to ever look at it, but I'm happy if they do. Consider using SETLOCAL and ENDLOCAL within your script to prevent temporary environment variables from carrying through to outer shells. exit /b %errorlevel% See also question about exiting batch file subroutine. Batch File Raise Error But since the DOS command to determine the return code is IF ERRORLEVEL, most people use the name errorlevel.

IF ERRORLEVEL construction has one strange feature, that can be used to our advantage: it returns TRUE if the return code was equal to or higher than the specified errorlevel. some_program.exe 2>&1 | FIND "error message here" && (ECHO ERROR & EXIT /b) some_program.exe 2>&1 | FIND "Done processing." || (ECHO ERROR & EXIT /b) share|improve this answer edited Nov 26 ENDLOCAL set SOME_EXTERNAL_VARIABLE=1 GOTO :EOF :USAGE echo Please provide a command line parameter. http://sammcallister.com/batch-file/dos-command-error-message.html not found, access denied) or by the executable itself.

Otherwise, I can only suggest cycling through the drive letters using "IF EXIST" to find the batch file name, but that might throw "drive not ready" errors for removable drives such You'll need something more like: setlocal enabledelayedexpansion for %%f in (C:\Windows\*) do ( same-executable-over-and-over.exe /with different "parameters" if !errorlevel! more stack exchange communities company blog Stack Exchange Inbox Reputation and Badges sign up log in tour help Tour Start here for a quick overview of the site Help Center Detailed Join them; it only takes a minute: Sign up Batch Files - Error Handling up vote 35 down vote favorite 2 I'm currently writing my first batch file for deploying an

Not the answer you're looking for? Uh oh, something bad happened exit /b 1 ) Or to give more info about what happened c:\mypath\myexe.exe 2&1> myexe.log find "Invalid File" "myexe.log" >nul2>nul && echo.Invalid File error in Myexe.exe All Rights Reserved. However, at the set time (4am daily or so), it always does things differently with an error.

A very helpful feature is the built-in DOS commands like ECHO, IF, and SET will preserve the existing value of %ERRORLEVEL%. Can anyone give me any pointers? So yeah. –harpo Aug 31 at 20:54 1 @system-PAUSE is there any difference between the first two 'if' shown? –user9999999 Sep 20 at 22:09 add a comment| up vote 154 Set :: ERRORLEVEL > 1 before returning to caller.

Living on an Isolated Peninsula - Making it Impossible to Leave Baby Rudin Chapter 4 Exercise 1 At age 25, is it still okay to wear dental braces to work? SomeFile.exe IF %ERRORLEVEL% EQU 9009 ( ECHO error - SomeFile.exe not found in your PATH ) It’s hard to know this stuff upfront – I generally just use trial and error share|improve this answer edited Feb 4 '13 at 19:27 answered Feb 4 '13 at 17:33 Patrick Meinecke 943515 add a comment| up vote 2 down vote Most commands/programs return a 0 The ability to easily use .Net assemblies and methods was one of the major reasons I started with PowerShell.

Change Windows 7 default logon screen background ► September (3) ► June (1) ► May (2) ► February (2) ► January (3) ► 2010 (8) ► December (1) ► November (1) set ERRORLEVEL= start "" "C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\office11\winword.exe" if ERRORLEVEL 1 goto error qprocess winword.exe echo *Start.success* Errorlevel is: %ERRORLEVEL% echo. batch-file share|improve this question edited Sep 19 '14 at 10:13 Nakilon 20k86389 asked Apr 9 '09 at 14:56 Josh Kodroff 10.3k2173127 1 What command shell will be running your script?